• From Bob Easton on Carving a Dragon & Acanthus Leaf Design - Episode 1

    Episode 15 is a real treat!!!

    Mary shows how to make a mold of the completed work. You might not want to duplicate a lot of dragons, but how about making multiples of carvings that are models for simple (and cost-sensitive) architectural embellishments.

    THANKS Mary. This is a great bonus!

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    2013/09/26 at 10:43 am
    • From Mary May on Carving a Dragon & Acanthus Leaf Design - Episode 1

      Great idea! I am planning on putting this as a separate video simply focusing on the mold making process.

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      2013/09/27 at 12:21 am
      • From Bob Easton on Carving a Dragon & Acanthus Leaf Design - Episode 1

        Wonderful!

        And when you do, how about showing us the product you use for the mold. There are probably many silicone mold products, but if we've never used one, it would be good to know what actually works. Not an endorsement, but a suggestion.

        Then... it could get messy... what about resins?

        Thanks.

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        2013/09/27 at 8:17 am
        • From Mary May on Carving a Dragon & Acanthus Leaf Design - Episode 1

          Hi Bob,
          The company I purchase this from is Smooth-on. I will discuss this in more detail in the "mold making" video. The mold material is Mold Max 30 Silicone Rubber. The resin is still an ongoing journey of discovery. I have used several (which all get quite expensive - sometimes up to $80 to $100/gallon) and am still sort of experimenting. Some have a working time of about 3 minutes, which is a little nerve-wracking. 10 minutes is ideal to be able to mix, pour and do any adjustments - without wearing it all :). Smoothe-on has a great web site - https://www.smooth-on.com

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          2013/09/27 at 9:05 am
  • From Paul Ebert on What videos would you like to see?

    Mary,Have you or would you consider a video on the carving done on old flintlock rifles from colonioal times.This is quite abit smaller carving than what I;ve seen but thought I'd throw it out there for consideration.Thanks,Paul

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    2013/09/20 at 12:07 pm
    • From Mary May on What videos would you like to see?

      Hi Paul,
      I have not carved any of these, but certainly would consider doing a video on this - if I had a gunstock I could carve on. There are some fabulous web sites about gun stock carving where you can get some beautiful acanthus scroll designs. The main difficulty is carving in such a small scale. You will need little micro tools and very steady hands. What I would suggest if you were going to do this is to carve whatever design you ar wanting in 3 times the size so you can get a better idea of how the shapes work. Then carve it in the gunstock in reduced size. At that point it's just figuring out how to get the itty bitty tools to make the cuts.

      Have fun!

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      2013/09/23 at 1:35 pm
      • From Paul Ebert on What videos would you like to see?

        Thanks for the advise Maryu. On top of all that it would be in tiger striped .curly Maple.hah Better have sharp tools right?
        Maybe just a video on the C scroll design layout and how to put them all together.thanks again.

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        2013/09/23 at 4:38 pm
  • From Larry Hartgrove on Carving a Grape & Leaf Design - Episode 1

    Mary, Very good. I learned so much. Thanks, can't weight to try out what I have learned on a big project that I started last year or was it year before last. Well thanks again. Keep carving

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    2013/09/14 at 8:42 pm
    • From Thomas Reno on Carving a Grape & Leaf Design - Episode 1

      You should consider making some wooden bench dogs to replace those chisel killers.

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      2013/12/23 at 8:57 am
      • From Mary May on Carving a Grape & Leaf Design - Episode 1

        🙂 Yeah... that WOULD be a good idea. I think I need to have them as an option - that's for sure. The really nice thing about the metal ones is that if I ever have tall pieces where I need to raise them off the bench a few inches, they still stay sturdy. But... for simply holding a board - great idea. Oak? What are wooden bench dogs normally made of?

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        2013/12/23 at 9:14 am
        • From Bob Easton on Carving a Grape & Leaf Design - Episode 1

          My round wooden dogs are Oak. My square ones are some sort of Asian mystery wood that's not quite as hard as Oak and readily available at the nearest big orange box store. It yields easily to edge tools.

          The square dogs have a leaf spring of soft cedar that does a great job of keeping then from falling through the holes. The secret to the springs is shaving the end near the screw to be thinner than the rest of the piece, causing it to spring outward.

          Picture: here.

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          2013/12/28 at 1:11 pm
  • From Sándor Csata on Workshop Tour - Beginner Lesson #16

    Thank you Mary for the guided tour. You have got fantastic artifacts in your shop. It feels like in a Museum.

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    2013/09/06 at 11:39 am
  • From David Taylor on Carving a Grape & Leaf Design - Episode 1

    This is a pretty piece. My mother is one of those people with a theme house, and I grew up surrounded by grapes. Grape wallpaper, copper grape jello molds hanging on the walls, plastic grapes in basket cornucopias on the coffee table, just grapes everywhere. While I watched these videos, I was struck with an idea. You mention repeating the pattern on a frieze, I am thinking around the sides and up on the top of a small box, I think Mom would like that.

    One question - I didn't see you do so, and at the end when you were turning the piece around, I only got a glimpse of the edges, but did you undercut the leaf at all?

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    2013/09/05 at 10:31 pm
    • From Mary May on Carving a Grape & Leaf Design - Episode 1

      Hi David,
      I did not intentionally undercut this, but it certainly can be done, and would really make the leaf stand out. With basswood, I wouldn't try to undercut it too much, as it can get very fragile - just enough so you don't see the straight edges. If you do undercut, it's best to do this towards the end of the carving. Just keep in mind, when you make those initial vertical cuts that define the edge of the leaf, don't make them to deep, as they will show as cuts in the background - unless you lower the background to a depth below these 🙂

      Happy carving!

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      2013/09/09 at 9:57 pm