• From Mary May on Carving Egg & Dart Molding in Poplar

    Got it. I'll get that included as soon as I can. I actually have some left-over molding that I can simply trace exactly.

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    2012/08/30 at 10:07 pm
  • From Mary May on Carving Reeds on a Table Leg

    Shannon,
    I actually have one, but it is all videoed at about bench height - you would not want to see what is stacked around the shop below bench level. But, yes... I will get one on the site eventually.

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    2012/08/30 at 10:05 pm
  • From Shannon Rogers on Carving Reeds on a Table Leg

    A right of passage for anyone who posts woodworking videos online is to do the shop tour video. Didn't you get that memo?

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    2012/08/30 at 8:25 pm
  • From Shannon Rogers on Starting to Carve

    Mary,

    Can you explain why the basic starter set of gouges recommended in the PDF is a good starter set? Also why the choices for the optional set. I apologize if you have covered this somewhere already but I'm curious what the thought process was behind these specific sweeps and sizes.

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    2012/08/30 at 8:01 pm
    • From Mary May on Starting to Carve

      Hmmmm. Interesting question. The answer could go several ways. They are simply my favorite tools??? They are the ones I have discovered through the years to be the most useful with no specialty gouges (spoon bent, etc). These are the ones I grab off the shelf and use as my own "standard" set. Purchasing a "basic" set of tools can get very expensive if the numbers go to 10 or 15 if you are just testing out woodcarving as a possible hobby - that is why I tried to limit it to a smaller number to start. The basic set can get you started with MOST relief carving.

      The v-chisel is used quite often. The #3 gouges are used often for basic backgrounding, and also quite a lot of the shaping in the carving itself. Then I filled in a variety of curved gouges that I use quite often in basic shaping.

      The optional set is if you are wanting to get into more variety of carving, and if you decide that this is truly something you want to invest more money and tools in. I have seen too many people who buy a set of 20 to 30 gouges at the start (hundreds of dollars worth) and discover that it is not something the really want to persue - those are the ones where you get some great deals at garage sales! This optional set is also tools I took from the more advanced videos shown on the site, so if you were wanting to try carving the projects from each video, you would have all the tools required (I may have to update this as I add videos, but not by much).

      Hope that explains things better.

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      2012/08/30 at 10:23 pm
  • From Shannon Rogers on Starting to Carve - Beginner Lesson #2

    Mary,

    Can you explain why the basic starter set of gouges recommended in the PDF is a good starter set? Also why the choices for the optional set. I apologize if you have covered this somewhere already but I'm curious what the thought process was behind these specific sweeps and sizes.

    Go to comment
    2012/08/30 at 8:01 pm
    • From Mary May on Starting to Carve - Beginner Lesson #2

      Hmmmm. Interesting question. The answer could go several ways. They are simply my favorite tools??? They are the ones I have discovered through the years to be the most useful with no specialty gouges (spoon bent, etc). These are the ones I grab off the shelf and use as my own "standard" set. Purchasing a "basic" set of tools can get very expensive if the numbers go to 10 or 15 if you are just testing out woodcarving as a possible hobby - that is why I tried to limit it to a smaller number to start. The basic set can get you started with MOST relief carving.

      The v-chisel is used quite often. The #3 gouges are used often for basic backgrounding, and also quite a lot of the shaping in the carving itself. Then I filled in a variety of curved gouges that I use quite often in basic shaping.

      The optional set is if you are wanting to get into more variety of carving, and if you decide that this is truly something you want to invest more money and tools in. I have seen too many people who buy a set of 20 to 30 gouges at the start (hundreds of dollars worth) and discover that it is not something the really want to persue - those are the ones where you get some great deals at garage sales! This optional set is also tools I took from the more advanced videos shown on the site, so if you were wanting to try carving the projects from each video, you would have all the tools required (I may have to update this as I add videos, but not by much).

      Hope that explains things better.

      Go to comment
      2012/08/30 at 10:23 pm