• From Bob Easton on Carving a Grape & Leaf Design - Episode 1

    Oh.... Other people get knotty wood too?

    More than once, I've ended up making a background lower than originally intended. After digging a valley to get the knotty area smooth, the valley had to be eliminated by taking everything else down yet more. You make it look easy!

    Thanks for another helpful lesson through a difficult part of the carving.

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    2013/09/05 at 2:59 pm
    • From Mary May on Carving a Grape & Leaf Design - Episode 1

      Pretty soon you reach the bench, and carving into the bench is not good.

      And there is NO way you can make these cuts with the grain without something coming up and biting you. These can only be cut securely across the grain.

      Have fun!

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      2013/09/05 at 5:37 pm
  • From Bob Edwards on Carving a Shell & Acanthus Leaf Design - Episode 1

    Mary, I too would like to have casting of this, Bob Edwards, Gainesville Ga

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    2013/08/24 at 4:56 pm
  • From Autumn Doucet on Carving a Shell & Acanthus Leaf Design - Episode 1

    Do you have a plaster casting available for purchase of the shell and acanthus mirror carving?

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    2013/08/18 at 5:18 pm
    • From Mary May on Carving a Shell & Acanthus Leaf Design - Episode 1

      Autumn,
      I did make a rubber mold of this, but will probably need to make the casting with resin so it is more stable, which will make it more expensive. It might be as much as $45 or $50 for the casting. If you're interested, let me know and I will make one.

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      2013/08/18 at 10:25 pm
  • From Michael Greenwood on Carving a Donut - Beginner Lesson #6

    Hi Mary,
    Just starting the course and really liking it.
    Question: What type or species of mahogany is best for carving?
    Thank you.
    Michael

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    2013/08/18 at 12:12 pm
    • From Mary May on Carving a Donut - Beginner Lesson #6

      Hi Michael,
      That's a tough one because I really don't purchase my own mahogany much of the time. I quite often get my wood from furniture makers that I work for and they normally try to get Honduran (which is very difficult to get these days) or African mahogany. Try not to get what is referred to as sepele, as it can be very dense and grain going in some crazy directions - switching direction about every 1/2 inch or so. African mahogany is a hit and miss - sometimes it can be very good, sometimes not. Ultimately try to be in a position where you can see the wood before purchasing it - get straight, tight grain. Hope this helps.

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      2013/08/18 at 10:32 pm
  • From Abbas Moghadam on Starting to Carve

    I would like to appreciate you for your good method in learning .For me as a beginner , watching the videos are very interesting and useful.

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    2013/08/12 at 4:50 am